Mogadishu on Campus

The Kakistocracy

I am certain there were such oxymorons as “Somali-Americans” in 1993. But none of which I had ever heard. As far as most people I knew were concerned that cultural eon ago, a little bit of Africans went a long way. The tacit agreement being that our own black native stock was quite sufficient to provide the country’s welfare workers and prison guards with ample employment security without need of additional stimulus.

And so whatever it is Africans did was best done there.

Unfortunately, that’s the sort of quixotic reasoning that doesn’t long survive the pen of neocon presidencies. And Bush 1 had a lot of ink to spill. Of course there was the Immigration Act of 1990 signed by GHWB after being sponsored in congress by Edward Kennedy (naturally). But laws like that take time to season into civil war, and George’s clock was ticking. So the first Iraq-attaq…

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#Pizzagate coincidence

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Dear Economist,

Dear Economist,
I have been a reader and subscriber to this magazine for more than twenty years, appreciating both the thorough, fact based analysis of many of the subjects presented and the high quality of the prose.

That is why I am particularly dismayed by your reporting in general concerning the issue of immigration into Europe where you constantly promote the idea that apparently any form of immigration is good for the host countries.

As a well integrated immigrant myself (Ireland to France when I was 18), it’s an idea that I was not intrinsically hostile to but my experience in recent years in France, Belgium the Netherlands and Germany now has me worried that by promoting this idea, you are actively promoting the destruction of most of what is presently good about Europe.

Based on this I suggest that rather than continuing promoting the idea that the sort of immigration we are presently experiencing in Europe is good, without providing any fact based analysis to support it, you do one of your generally excellent in-depth studies on the subject.

Leaving aside the humanitarian dimension of the issue, here is a, non-exhaustive, list of the questions I suggest this study should address:
1.Average socio-economic profiles of the immigrants who are presently pouring into Europe (Age, gender, education…) bearing in mind that most come from countries where mean number of years of education vary between 4 and 6 compared to 12 – 13 for European kids? See http://hdr.undp.org/en/composite/HDI

2. Employment rates for such immigrants after 2 years, 5 years , 10 years etc.. and the nature of the employment ie. earning enough to pay taxes or still taking more out of the system than they are putting in?

3. Same questions for 2nd generation immigrants by ethnic origin?

4. Why we even need such immigration when we already have huge levels of unemployment, especially youth unemployment, in most European countries?

5. Average “integration costs” for such immigrants (free housing, language courses, professional training, health care, living expenses….) ?

6. Average numbers of family members brought in later under family reunification rules?

7. Impact on public finances (and deficits) of this immigration?

8. Ability of our existing welfare states to cope ( financial and human resources) with the ever increasing demands that are being placed on them?

9. Potential impact of creeping islamisation on generally secular, tolerant and open societies?

10. Percentage of crimes (both violent and non-violent) committed by 1st and 2nd generated immigrants?

11. Security costs of keeping immigrant communities under surveillance due to high risk of Islamic terrorism, crime etc..?

When I see clear and positive answers to these questions which, BTW our politicians should also be asking, I will be far more receptive towards the arguments for allowing mass immigration to continue. For now, unfortunately, I see it mostly as an unmitigated disaster which is going to get far worse before it gets better leading to a continuing increase in extremism on all sides.

So, when do we get a properly researched in-depth article on the subject?

Zombienomicon (R) – Celephais

I did a comic a few years ago called Kid Celephais, basically a sort of Walter Mitty meets H.P. Lovecraft’s version of the Dream-Lands. It wasn’t particularly good, more an exploration of ideas.

Now I am returning to Celephais, under the Zombienomicon (R) umbrella.

I am adapting Celephais itself in the same way Marvel adapted the ‘real’ Conan stories first before splitting off into their own continuity. Much the same approach here, I will begin with Celephais, adapting it word for word as text for the comic book pictures. This is effectively the origin of a Superman type character, albeit the god of a city-state in the Dream-Lands.

On such sparse threads I am then going to weave the further adventures of Kuranes, as the hero of Celephais (and Ooth-Nargai) and Serannian the city in the clouds. Adventures, mysteries and so on.

I am putting it under the Zombienomicon (R) rubric for three reasons. Firstly, adapting the public domain HPL work is going to lead to spinning off of new tales, and these tales in my own mythology properly fall under the Zombienomicon type story cycle – forbidden book, altered realities and so on. Secondly, Kuranes as Dream-Land Superman is a titanic character and he needs serious threats and challenges for his adventures to be remotely interesting. Deadoids, vampires, lost pocket universes and powerful adversaries come naturally from the Zombienomicon worlds. Thirdly it suits the general atmosphere of neo-Gothic, watercolor artwork and so on.

I am using a variety of art techniques on the Celephais stuff, ranging from scanned watercolors, GiMP rendering, and scanning and distorting collages.

I keep toying with the idea of doing 3D physical art too – physical maquettes and cardboard standup versions of the city, or some location that warrants it. I did a little bit of that for Bogatyr (which became part of the Zombienomicon Eisegesis book) and it’s fun, if time consuming. I really need to set a table up properly if I am going to be photographing physical cardboard etc. and that might be the dealbreaker. No time. No space.

 

Bracken: What I Saw At The Coup

Western Rifle Shooters Association


Short-fuse fiction by Matt Bracken intended to spread alarm among progressives, in the spirit of dispiriting them from ever attempting such a mad folly in order to cling to power. Matt Bracken is the author of the Enemies Foreign And Domestic trilogy, and Castigo Cay.

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This is the first time in many years that I have put pen to paper for a lengthy letter, so please forgive my misspellings, poor handwriting or any other errors. I will probably do this in one go and be finished with it. I won’t need much of this new notebook. It’s a nice room, desk and chair, but really, no computer? I just wish they would stop the hammering outside. I need to focus in order to write well.

No one person could possibly expect to know the full truth about such a complex history, so near to its time. But…

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